"You judge a woman
by the length of her skirt,
by the way she walks,
talks, looks, and acts;
by the color of her skin you judge
and will call her “bitch!”
“Black bitch!”
if she doesn’t answer your:
“Hey baby, whatcha gonna say
to a man.”
You judge a woman
by the job she holds,
by the number of children she’s had,
by the number of digits on her check;
by the many men she may have lain with
and wonder what jive murphy
you’ll run on her this time.
You tell a woman
every poetic love line
you can think of,
then like the desperate needle
of a strung out junkie
you plunge into her veins,
travel wild through her blood,
confuse her mind, make her hate
and be cold to the men to come,
destroying the thread of calm
she held.
You judge a woman
by what she can do for you alone
but there’s no need
for slaves to have slaves.
You judge a woman
by impressions you think you’ve made.
Ask and she gives,
take without asking,
beat on her and she’ll obey,
throw her name up and down the streets
like some loose whistle —
knowing her neighbors will talk.
Her friends will chew her name.
Her family’s blood will run loose
like a broken creek.
And when you’re gone,
a woman is left
healing her wounds alone.
But we so called men,
we so called brothers
wonder why it’s so hard
to love our women
when we’re about loving them
the way america
loves us."

— essex hemphill (via ethiopienne)

(Source: andohpooratlas, via mishlapi)


YA BASTA!
fuckyeahsarahjane:

Stenciled outside many of the homes in Suchitoto
"What is interesting, is that the Frida Kahlo venerated by American feminists is a very different Frida Kahlo to the one people learn about in Mexico, in the Chicano community. In her country, she is recognized as an important artist and a key figure in revolutionary politics of early 20th century Mexico. Her communist affiliations are made very clear. Her relationship with Trotsky is underscored. All her political activities with Diego Rivera are constantly emphasized. The connection between her art and her politics is always made. When Chicana artists became interested in Frida Kahlo in the ‘70s and started organizing homages, they made the connection between her artistic project and theirs because they too were searching for an aesthetic compliment to a political view that was radical and emancipatory. But when the Euro-American feminists latch onto Frida Kahlo in the early ‘80s and when the American mainstream caught on to her, she was transformed into a figure of suffering. I am very critical of that form of appropriation."

Coco Fusco on her Amerindians piece from 1992 with Guillermo Gómez-Peña (via tofunkey)

This.

(via fuckyeahchicanopower)

(Source: bombsite.com, via withoutapology)

"broken english"

when my mother struggles to spell a word in english
I want to break the entire language
into little pieces
so the edges of these letters
will stop cutting her


— aysha via
Diaspora Defiance
(via decolonizehistory)

(via withoutapology)

"

be mindful. not. to let oppression become the definition of your skin. your gender. your non gender. your non sexuality. your sexuality. or anything about you. be mindful that oppression is a thing outside of you. that is always begging to come inside. it is not your given name. you know what your name is. and if you are trapped in the fog of forget. spend the nights and the days re.membering your name.

oppression is the the thing that wants to become your name. do not allow it.

"

— re.membering your name, nayyirah waheed (via nayyirahwaheed)

(via nayyirahwaheed)