theeconomist:

Who gets murdered in America
The murder rate in America among black men between the ages of 20-24 is over 100 per 100,000. If this group were a country, it would be more violent than Honduras, the world’s most violent nation. 
sapphrikah:

SAY IT AGAIN
iusedtoloveherr:

2025 Telegraph Ave. Oakland, CA.
mountainmaiden:

“When anti-colonial action is complete, there is no guarantee that the settler has learned any more about who he is, or where he comes from. The inner work to heal the spirit from historic traumas that allow and perpetuate colonization may not be engaged.
Decolonization creates the possibility for the settler to become something more - to heal Indigenous identity, story, and spirit and deconstruct the very source of colonizing thought.”
-Awakening the Horse People wordpress
"I guess my feminism and my race are the same thing to me. They’re tied in one to another, and I don’t feel an alliance or an allegiance with upper-class white women. I don’t. I can listen to them and on some level as a human being I can feel great compassion and friendships; but they have to move from their territory to mine, because I know their world. But they don’t know mine."

— Sandra Cisneros, Chicana Feminist Thought (via mujerdiabla)

(Source: okbesko, via lachicanarosie)

"The pull between what is and what should be. I believe that by changing ourselves we change the world, that traveling El Mundo Zurdo path is the path of a two-way movement—a going deep into the self and an expanding out into the world, a simultaneous recreation of the self and a reconstruction of society. And yet, I am confused as to how to accomplish this […] I can’t reconcile the sight of a battered child with the belief that we choose what happens to us, that we create our own world. I cannot resolve this in myself. I don’t know. I can only speculate, try to integrate the experiences that I’ve had or have been witness to and try to make some sense of why we do violence to each other. In short, I’m trying to create a religion not out there somewhere, but in my gut. I am trying to make peace between what has happened to me, what the world is, and what it should be."

— Gloria Anzaldúa, “La Prieta” (via whentherewerebicycles)

(via noterajeschicanita)

» Listen to “Sounds of American Freedom” from Smithsonian Folkways Recordings.

#TBT! On this day in 1963, 250,000 people gathered in Washington DC to rally for civil and economic rights for African Americans, culminating in Martin Luther King, Jr.’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech. Listen to the “Sounds of American Freedom” playlist, featuring freedom songs prominent in the movement.

(Source: daughtersofdig)

"To acknowledge our ancestors means we are aware that we did not make ourselves. We remember them because it is an easy thing to forget; that we are not the first to suffer, rebel, fight, love and die. The grace with which we embrace life, in spite of the pain, the sorrows, is always a measure of what has gone before."

Alice Walker, “In These Dissenting Times” (via mal4suerte)

(Source: vanity-is-a-verb, via noterajeschicanita)